Best of 2017

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I was contemplating not making a list of my favorites this year, but a) I looooove lists and b) I enjoy looking back at them, so here we go.

Favorite books of 2017, in chronological order because I can’t be arsed to pick favorites among my favorites. All of these are novels, unless stated otherwise.

  • A Christmas Memory by Truman Capote (three short stories)
  • Fun Home by Alison Bechdel (graphic novel)
  • Let Them Eat Chaos by Kate Tempest (poetry; available on Spotify)
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
  • The Color Purple by Alice Walker
  • Tess of the d’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
  • The Yellow Wall-Paper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (short story)
  • Thud! by Terry Pratchett
  • Çalıkuşu by Reşat Nuri Güntekin
  • No Matter the Wreckage by Sarah Kay (poetry, also the only 2017 book that made it to my Favorites shelf on Goodreads)
  • The Hippopotamus by Stephen Fry
  • The Awakening by Kate Chopin
  • Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett (play)
  • Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson

Favorite albums, in no order, mostly, except for the first 5.

  • Lea Michele – Places
  • Hey Violet – From the Outside
  • All Time Low – Last Young Renegade
  • Sarah Close – Caught Up
  • Taylor Swift – Reputation
  • Betty Who – The Valley
  • Halsey – hopeless fountain kingdom
  • John Mayer – The Search for Everything
  • Paramore – After Laughter
  • Imagine Dragons – Evolve
  • P!nk – Beautiful Trauma
  • The Maine – Lovely Little Lonely
  • Ed Sheeran – Divide
  • Harry Styles – Harry Styles

Movies & TV, once again, in no order because it’s not like there’s a lot to begin with.

  • Brooklyn Nine-Nine
  • Rick and Morty
  • Star Trek: Discovery (also a general shout-out to Bryan Fuller)
  • Stranger Things
  • Doctor Who
  • Marvel’s The Punisher
  • Wonder Woman
  • Logan
  • La La Land
  • Atomic Blonde
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Best of 2016

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I wasn’t planning on writing anything this year, but in the end decided to compile a quick list, just for myself, with no explanations. It was quite a nice year for me media-wise, with comic books, Hamilton and MCU dominating most of it. Also it’s so easy to forget by the end of the year all the things you loved at the beginning of it, jeez.

Books

10 // The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling

9 // The Inimitable Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse

8 // The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield

// Fables (vol.1-4) by Bill Willingham

6 // Au bonheur des ogres by Daniel Pennac

5 // A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

4 // Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson

3 // Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides

2 // Preacher by Garth Ennis

1 // Hawkeye by Matt Fraction

Music

16 // Little Mix

15 // Gabrielle Aplin

14 // Lauren Aquilina

13 // One Direction

12 // BTS

11 // Hedley

10 // TWICE

9 // The 1975

8 // Florence + The Machine

7 // Sara Bareilles

6 // All Time Low

5 // Panic! at the Disco

4 // Halsey

3 // New Politics

2 // Daughter

1 // Hamilton

Movies / TV

1 // Marvel Cinematic Universe (all movies + Daredevil, Agent Carter s1)

2 // Moana

3 // Deadpool

4 // Pride and Prejudice (1995 mini-series)

5 // Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

6 // Star Trek Beyond

7 // Arrival

8 // Clueless

9 // Monty Python and the Holy Grail

10 // Teen Wolf (but it’s No. 1 in my heart forever and ever and ever okay)

2017 Reading Plans

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I have a list of 58 classics I want to read in 2017. I will probably add a few titles to that list over the course of the year, so basically it means an average of 5 classics per month. And while some of them are essays and plays, some are huge, like Vanity Fair and The Forsyte Saga. I’ll probably do a quick check mid-year to see how things go, because to be honest, I’m not feeling very optimistic at the moment.

Also I want to read as much feminist literature as I can get my hands on. Some of the titles are already on my list, but contemporary ones are not. There’s also the fact that many of them I simply can’t get here, because I live in the most useless country in the world, ugh.

Anyway, here’s the list:

1. J. Milton, Paradise Lost
2. C. Dickens, Great Expectations
3. W.M. Thackeray, Vanity Fair Continue reading

T5W: Characters You Wouldn’t Want to Trade Places With

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Let’s not talk about this past month, please and thank you. Let’s begin, shall we?

  1. Any of John Green’s girls. Or boys. Or anyone.
  1. John Watson from Sherlock Holmes. I’d make a shitty sidekick; I’d rather be Sherlock.
  1. John the Savage from Brave New World. First of all, I hated this book so I wouldn’t want to be any of its characters. Also, poor boy.
  1. Charlie from Flowers for Algernon. A mentally disabled man becomes a lab rat for people who can increase his IQ, which works— for a while. As far as classics go, this is one of my favorites, BUT.
  1. Liesel Meminger from The Book Thief. Don’t know what to say without spoiling the whole book, but— Germany, WWII, just. Nope.

T5W: Rainy Day Reads

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This is actually one of last April’s topics, but I never did it, and also today’s one (favorite first sentences) is not something I’m particularly interested in doing, since I’ve read most of the books in Russian, and besides, the only first sentence that stands out to me is “It is a truth universally acknowledged…”, because I’m THAT cliché. Also the weather here is crap. It’s my blog, after all, so Imma do what I want! (But please leave links to your posts with today’s actual topic below, I would love to check them all out!)

Please don’t try to make sense of my associative chains. There is none. I’m a Gemini.

  1. Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children. I read this book two years ago, so all I can remember is that they were always wet. I’m not kidding.
  1. The Elegance of the Hedgehog. First of all, look at that beautiful title. Do you really need to know anything else about it to read it? Because I didn’t. And I just read it. And it was lovely. And sad, which is why it’s a rainy book.
  1. The Ocean at the End of the Lane. It’s dark blue. It’s about water (sort of). It’s slightly creepy.
  1. Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World. I could go with any of Murakami novels (or non-fictions, I think Underground is a really good rainy read), but this is one of my favorites, and also the one I would probably recommend to someone who wants to start reading Murakami and is not afraid of a little challenge (and if you want to play it safe – go for Norwegian Wood).
  1. The Book Thief. Because if the rain is loud enough, there’s a good chance no one will hear you cry.

T5W: Authors You Are Waiting on Another Book From

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Life is crazy. Life is so crazy I don’t have the time to stop and relax, and when I do I just crash. I want to do a collective summer wrap-up at the end of the month, and probably a tag or something before that, I just don’t have the strength to do anything else. I demand another summer after this one so that I’ll be able to finally have some rest. Ugh. Anyways! T5W!

  1. John Green – I don’t even know why I want another book by him. I absolutely love John as a person, he’s great, but I’ve read all of his novels and my favorite is Zombicorns. Really. The rest vary from ‘okay’ to ‘wtf was that’. I guess I’m masochistic like that.
  1. Jenny Lawson – I’ve read both her books this year, and both of them were great. I know that she’s releasing a coloring-but-also-more book in less than a year, but I would really love to read an actual book by her.
  1. Richard Siken – ‘Crush’ has influenced me in so many ways, and I got the title for this blog from one of his poems. Considering he has two poetry books published within 10 years of each other, I’m in for a long wait.
  1. Neil Gaiman – I still have quite a few of his novels to read, as well as short story collections, but really, you can’t have too much of a good thing, amirite?
  1. Haruki Murakami is up there with Terry Pratchett on the list of my favorite authors — and since sir Terry will not write another book anymore, Murakami is an obvious choice. I have read all of his novels and pretty much most everything he’s written.